The surprising way fumes from farms are harming our health

Editor’s note: This story was produced in collaboration with the Food & Environment Reporting Network, a non-profit investigative news organization. In the United States alone, air...

Plants are great at storing CO2. These scientists aim to make them even better.

Many strategies aimed at mitigating global warming involve huge shifts in human behavior: stop burning coal for electricity, stop driving gas-powered cars, stop destroying...

The biggest problem with e-waste? What we don’t know.

When your phone stops working or you trade up for a newer model, where does it go? Like any electronic device — from laptops to lamps, washing...

Small strips of prairie hold big hope for helping cure a multitude of environmental...

Tallgrass prairie, and the rich diversity of plants and animals it supports, covered 150 million acres (61 million hectares) of the central United States...

OPINION: Here’s a way you probably haven’t thought of to reduce allergies and asthma

Both allergy and asthma are epidemic in many urban environments. Asthma, once rare, is now one of the most common chronic childhood diseases in...

Protecting crops with predators instead of poisons

Editor’s note: This piece originally appeared at Environmental Health News. Summer carloads of sweet-toothed tourists, flush with cash and seeking local pies and jams, are...

New life for toxic land

When Charles Schmid first moved to Bainbridge Island, Washington, in 1970, the Wyckoff Company was still stripping bark from timber and treating the logs...

How land under solar panels can contribute to food security

At a recent solar energy conference in Minneapolis, attendees unwound at happy hour tasting free pints of a local honey-based India Pale Ale called...
Photo credit: Global Diaspora News

In search of safe replacements for harmful chemicals used in cookware, carpets, clothing, cosmetics...

When Donald Taves discovered two kinds of fluoride in his blood in the late 1960s, he immediately knew something was wrong. Everyone assumed that blood...

Has the Netherlands figured out how to mainstream seaweed?

“Is seaweed a vegetable?” a wide-eyed child asks a tall man chopping kelp at a “Taste the Nature” market in the Zuiderpark city farm...

Could venomous snails be part of the solution to the opioid epidemic?

Opioids are powerful pain relievers, but their addictive nature also creates powerful trouble for those who misuse them. Worldwide, millions of people suffer from...

Perennial versions of conventional crops offer benefits to the environment — but are they...

In 2000, noted crop breeder Stan Cox was weary of the Sisyphean task of incorporating new disease resistance traits into wheat varieties. Fumbling to...

You know clean air is good for your health. It’s good for the economy,...

When the Clean Air Act of 1970 became law, members of the business community in the United States responded with opposition. Such regulations are...

Innovators look to “accidental crops” as a nutritious, environmentally friendly and free source of...

Philip Stark was on a long run in the hills above Berkeley, California, when he started thinking differently about the wild green plants around...

What if U.S. fuel economy standards went away?

On March 15, 2017, U.S. president Donald Trump addressed carmakers at a newly constructed test track for self-driving cars and other mobility technology, the...

Can we meet a growing need for food without destroying our environment?

The history of agriculture is best described as getting “more for more.” The more land we farmed, the more food we produced. The more...

Humans, fish and other animals are consuming microfibers in our food and water

Editor’s note: This report is part two of a three-part series on the emerging threat of microfiber pollution. In part one we explored where...

OPINION: If we want our food to be truly sustainable, we need to be...

Our food is eating up the world’s tropical forests, thanks to growing global trade in agricultural commodities from tropical countries. Land for agricultural production...

As synthetic microfibers infiltrate food, water and air, how can we prevent future release?

Editor’s note: This is the final installment in a three-part series on the emerging threat of microfiber pollution. In part one we investigated where...

OPINION: Farmers need flexibility to fight Lake Erie’s algae problem

Phosphorus from fertilizer running off cropland has been identified as the main culprit behind Lake Erie’s algal woes, and the potential for governments in...

Watch: Who holds the solution to microfiber pollution?

As our recent multimedia series by journalist Mary Catherine O’Connor points out, microfiber pollution is a growing problem around the world, with miniature contaminants...

Reshaping Africa’s rural food systems and cutting food losses

Cicily Wanjira has a big smile when she shows off the plump mangoes dangling from 600 trees on her small rural farm 175 kilometers...

A soil microbe saved my life

Before my first chemotherapy appointment, I read that some people taste the drugs as they are being injected. But all I could taste was...

This study argues genetic modification could help quinoa, millet and other naturally stress-resistant plants...

Drought, extreme temperatures, salt in the soil: Because of conditions like these — which scientists call abiotic stresses — the fields that feed the...