Photo Credit: DiasporaEngager, the World's #1 International Diaspora Engagement Social Media Network Platform (www.DiasporaEngager.com), by Courtesy of Dr. Roland Holou. © All rights reserved.
Photo Credit: DiasporaEngager, the World's #1 International Diaspora Engagement Social Media Network Platform (www.DiasporaEngager.com), by Courtesy of Dr. Roland Holou. © All rights reserved.

BALTIMORE –The NAACP prepares to mobilize thousands of millennials and youth activists within the black community at the upcoming 110th National Convention, taking place in Detroit, Michigan from July 20 to 24. The convention will feature a wide variety of events and workshops that will empower the leaders of tomorrow to create a better world for all people to thrive.

“Now more than ever this country understands and recognizes that there are consequences to not listening to young black leaders. Of all the other spaces that exist for our movement to come together, this one should be taken the most seriously,” said Tiffany Dena Loftin, NAACP National Youth and College Director. “When we come together to share new knowledge, challenge oppressive narratives, and when we celebrate each other, our movement gains momentum. When we leave convention this movement of millennials and Generation Z will be reignited to recruit new leaders, lead with solutions, and use their political agency to take America off cruise control.”

The Youth and College Division of the NAACP has been recharged in the last year since National Director, Tiffany Dena Loftin has joined the Association. On January 19, 2019 hundreds of young NAACP men and women joined the national fight for women’s rights and attended the historic Women’s March in the nation’s capital, continuing its work to promote sustained advocacy and protect civil rights in the modern era.

The youth and college programming at the 110th convention will feature a series of captivating and informational workshops and events all leading up to the grand finale, the Juanita Jackson Mitchell Dinner Royal Gala: Black Renaissance, on Tuesday, July 23, 2019, at the COBO Center. The gala will celebrate the hard work, dedication, and contributions of hard-fought student activism by NAACP’s next generation of leaders.

Media interested in covering the event should apply for credentials here.

Attendees will have the opportunity to meet prominent voices in advocacy today. Writer and Civil Rights Activist Shaun King will moderate the Roy Wilkins Luncheon: Democracy In Color. Kid Fury and Crissle West of The Read Podcast, will host the Black Renaissance Royal Gala, and writer and economist Derrick Grace II will lead a workshop on Gun Violence Prevention.

The Youth and College Public Mass meeting will take place on Sunday, July 21. This will be an open, facilitated, discussion on creating the black millennial agenda. The conversation will center on accessibility and defeating all odds with Harvard University’s first blind and deaf graduate, Haben Girma serving as moderator. This event will be free and open to the public.

ABOUT NAACP 110TH CONVENTION:

The NAACP Convention brings together over 10,000 activists, organizers, and leaders to set policies priorities for the coming year. Highlights will include a Presidential Candidates Forum, a legislative session, a CEO Roundtable, LGBTQ workshop, the awarding of the prestigious Spingarn Medal to Ambassador Patrick Gaspard, and the signature NAACP Experience retail expo and diversity career fair. More information about the 110th Annual NAACP National Convention, including a detailed schedule of events may be found by visiting naacpconvention.org.

Media interested in covering the event should apply for press credentials here.

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Founded in 1909, the NAACP is the nation’s oldest and largest nonpartisan civil rights organization. Its members throughout the United States and the world are the premier advocates for civil rights in their communities. You can read more about the NAACP’s work and our six “Game Changer” issue areas here.

Source: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). The content of this article does not necessarily reflect the views or opinion of Global Diaspora News (www.GlobalDiasporaNews.com).